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USAG Daegu School Support Services - Dedicated to your child's education

The School Liaison Officer works in conjunction with Child, Youth and School Services and the local school community to address educational issues involving military children.

For assistance with K-12 school questions or information please contact School Liaison Officer

Camp Walker building #257
Phone Number: DSN 764-5467
E-mail:

 

NOTICE TO NEW FAMILIES

 If your child will be needing to ride a school bus, and you will not be residing on post, please make sure you visit the DoDEA Transportation office on Camp George and check out their School Bus Zones maps before renting.  
There are certain areas the buses travel too and certain areas they do not.
These detailed maps can help you make an informed choice about where you are going to live.

 

SCHOOL INFORMATION

Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA):

Educational Programs:

SPECIAL EDUCATION

SPECIAL EDUCATION FAQs

1.  What is the Special Education Regulation or Guidance in the overseas schools?

 2.  Who determines if my child is eligible for *special services?

A Case Study Committee (CSC) follows a process outlined in the Special Education Procedural Guide that leads to determination of eligibility for special education services.  An existing Individual Education Program (IEP) provides information for overseas screening to pinpoint assignments based on availability of services in a particular location.  Services are offered to students 3–21 years of age who have been determined eligible in one of five **disability categories.

*Description of Special Services: autism spectrum, communication impaired, emotionally impaired, hearing impaired, specific learning disability, intellectual disability, preschool, and vision impaired

**Student's disability(ies) as defined in Criterion A (Physical Impairments), Criterion B (Emotional Impairments), Criterion C (Communication Impairments), Criterion D (Learning Impairments) and Criterion E (Developmental Delay) in DoD Instruction 1342.12

3.  How do I know which schools are able to serve my child’s disability in Korea?

Communities within DoDEA are identified by the levels of support services by disability category in place at specific locations. Cross reference the child’s level of support needed according to the IEP with the district, community, and school.  All military communities within a district are identified by the level of support available.  Note that in communities with multiple schools, not all programs are available in all schools.  Students may be transported to a neighboring school for services.

4. Is there a resource guide for Families with special needs?

US Army Pocket Resource Guidebook:
The Army‘s Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) had partnered with EP Global Communications on the Exceptional Family Transitional Training (EFTT) Program.  This initiative delivers education and information support for Families with special needs and their service providers.  This comprehensive listing of military, national and State resources will help Families transition successfully in areas such as early intervention, special education, mental health, and accessibility. 

Visit EP Magazine Website for resource guide:  http://www.eparent.com/

TRANSITIONS AND DEPLOYMENT

TRANSITIONS

The School Liaison Officer works with schools on transition issues to reduce barriers to smooth school transitions that military children face and to ease the adjustment into new schools. 

TRANSITION ISSUES

The Department of Defense has conducted meetings and participated in and reviewed studies to identify what some of the issues faced by the military student and suggestions for making these transitions easier.  Some of the educational, social, and emotional issues included:

- Educational Issues/Needs:

- Social Issues/Needs:

- Emotional Issues/Needs

If you are moving: Visit MCEC’s website at www.militarychild.org for tips

DEPLOYMENT 
DoD’s Military Child in Transition and Deployment program has identified some common educational issues/needs, social issues/needs, and emotional issues/needs as well as behaviors to monitor. 

- Educational Issues/Needs
During periods of deployment children share the following educational needs:

- Social Issues/Needs
Depending on age, a child may experience significant social issues and needs during a time of deployment. While preschool and elementary aged children typically require increased attention from parents and school, social interaction with peers can often take on increased value with adolescents. Although school and family must still play a significant role in their lives, it is important for adolescents to spend time with peers. Conversations and/or news coverage about war or deployment issues should be monitored for age-appropriateness.

- Emotional Issues/Needs
While individual children’s emotional needs and issues can vary drastically, all children need to maintain their daily routines at home and school to help cushion the impact of deployment. Common emotions during deployment include:

- Behaviors to Monitor
It is important to address these emotions with children and to provide them with reassurance and comfort. A child may exhibit a change in behavior while adjusting to being separated from his or her parent(s). However, if a child is exhibiting the following behavior six weeks after separation, a referral should be made to the appropriate parental, school, community or military service:

Other Websites for information to help with the transition and deployment:

 

HOMESCHOOL INFORMATION

HOME SCHOOLING

The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) has no jurisdiction over the education of overseas military dependent children.  It is DoDEA policy to neither encourage nor discourage DoD sponsors from home schooling their minor dependents.  DoDEA recognizes that homeschooling is a sponsor’s right and can be a legitimate alternative form of education for their dependents.  According to DoD policy, the installation Commander’s responsibilities are logistical or administrative, there is no educational oversight regarding the public education provided by DoDDS.

DoDEA HOME SCHOOLING POLICY

There are frequently asked questions among home schoolers:  Whose law do I follow – the state/country where we are stationed, or our state of residence?  What are the military regulations related to homeschooling?  Are there support groups at every installation?  Is there a phone number that I can call to find out about homeschooling on any particular installation?

The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) has no jurisdiction over the education of overseas American military dependent children.  It is DoDEA policy to neither encourage nor discourage DoD sponsors from home schooling their minor dependents.  DoDEA recognizes that homeschooling is a sponsor’s right and can be a legitimate alternative form of education for their dependents.  According to DoD policy, the installation Commander’s responsibilities are logistical or administrative, there is no educational oversight regarding the public education provided by DoDEA. 

In order for homeschooling to succeed, parents need to have the time and energy to provide instruction on a daily basis and be involved in a local support group.  Numerous avenues of support are usually available, so do some research and get connected with a local support group in your community.  Some parents form groups with other home-schooled families or encourage their children to join community sports teams, clubs, or other groups.  Many families are involved in homeschooling support groups.  These groups of parents share responsibilities, including choosing and adapting curriculum, the actual teaching of the lessons, and some method of grading and evaluating whether the student has learned the necessary lessons. 

What’s best for somebody else’s child may not be best for yours.  Before making a decision, it’s important to gather as much information as you can to find out about the kind of education that would benefit your child the most, whether it’s homeschooling or it’s another kind of school. 

Other Home School Websites:

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS                                                               

How old must a child be to start school?

What is the difference between block scheduling and traditional scheduling?

What type of scheduling do the middle and secondary schools use?

What are the major responsibilities of the School Liaison Officer?

Other Websites for information to help with Gifted Children

 

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